Make Your Mark.
Make It Matter.

Meet Dr. Charles Daramola

PROGRAM DIRECTOR, COMMUNITY & PUBLIC HEALTH
FACULTY MEMBER SINCE: 2012

“You can stand tall when mentioning FGCU in the community. As the only public university in the region, our name is met with credibility and great pride wherever you go.”

Dr. Charles DaramolaLife has a funny way of steering you toward where you’re meant to be. Such is the case with Dr. Charles Daramola.

Both his parents were educators. But, for some reason, that didn’t appeal to a young Charles. Instead, he studied business, earned his MBA and went into pharmaceutical sales and marketing with the intent of making a difference in people’s lives.

By the time he reached his early 30s, however, he felt that industry was becoming too commercial and the idea of helping people had fallen to the wayside. During the course of his work, he had also come across people who seemed to possess great potential, but lacked a mentor to help them develop their compassion and their voice. He felt called to focus on people like that. So he went back to school.

A few years after earning his Ed.D., Charles found FGCU. He immediately felt a kinship—he was starting something new and they were still relatively new. Plus, as he observed, “You get to do more and make more of an impact when something is still new.”

As the Program Director for Community and Public Health at FGCU, Charles is able to make that impact through both teaching and influencing curriculum. He is able to connect with students in ways that shape them into compassionate caregivers and leaders. And because class sizes are small at FGCU, he is able to get to know his students as human beings and mentor them in ways he couldn’t at a larger institution.

There is a quote from the film “The Last Samurai” that he feels sums up his journey: A man does what he can until his destiny finds him. “I’m here at FGCU for a reason,” Charles says, “and that reason materializes every day when I am able to mentor students and make a difference in peoples’ lives.”